• FAQ  • Search  • Memberlist  • Usergroups   • Register   • Profile  • Log in to check your private messages  • Log in 

Brass vs Silver Nickel for horns



 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> Horns
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
jgambill
Regular Member


Joined: 26 Jan 2010
Posts: 26
Location: Fredericksburg, VA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 5:17 am    Post subject: Brass vs Silver Nickel for horns Reply with quote

Is there any difference (real or imaginary) in horns that are all brass vs having some silver nickel parts such as the lead pipes and upper valve parts? I like the look you get from the two metal colors but is one superior to the other in sound or quality?

Thanks,
jgambill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
connicalman
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2007
Posts: 1538
Location: West Medford, MA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The lead pipe is what usually gets 'red rot' and then needs replacement, so nickle can be very good when placed inside there.*

Also, the lead pipe is critical - regardless of mouthpiece choice - to the voice of the horn.

there are many valid ways, each correct in its own right, to answer your question.

Sounds like you're shopping for a trumpet. Try the double blind test, and play the heck out of the trumpet which sounds best to you when you're blindfolded. Consider the feedback of a trusted friend, also blindfolded or unaware of what horn your playing.

For a good intro into different looks, durability& quality peruse the Conn Loyalist web pages. That said, when I play my 77B Connquest my lady seems to up and say: 'Hey, I like that song.' Thing is, her voice seems to match my sound on that horn. You can imagine all the other built-in biases in that situation, I'm sure. So yes, when she's around that's the one I play.

* Conn 76A cornets have a nickle lead pipe. It's wide sweep makes for much different sound & control of notes vs a trumpet. 1963 model, no rot.

Bottom line: play for a quality of sound, not a look.
_________________
kochaavim, csillaagkep, αστερρισμός, konnstelacji, connstellation... ...a.k.a. 28A
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shofarguy
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 5091
Location: AZ

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 6:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

j,

When I first bought a French taper mouthpipe for my Kanstul Chicago 1025 flugelhorn, the pipe I bought turned out to be nickel. Since the finish was silver plate, the only way to tell by looking was to take a scribe and scratch through the finish to see. I got a brass version, too.

There was a difference in response and timbre. The nickel pipe gave the horn a more structured feel, harder edged sound and tighter slots. The brass pipe produced a darker sound, softer in texture and more forgiving in response.

So, I think nickel is used to balance response characteristics and bring a crispness to a horn. Look at two Kanstul flugels, the 1025 and the 1525. The Chicago has a smaller, tighter bell taper and flare, which produces a compact sound that has plenty of core. No nickel is used in the tubing.

The 1525 has a big, soft, copper bell, a big open wrap and can sound pretty fluffy. To bring in some structure to the feel and sound, nickel is used on the valve tubing.

Flip does the same thing with the Celebration and Wild Thing horns, using nickel to offset any dullness that the bell might encourage.

Brian
_________________
Brian A. Douglas
Co-founder and President of nPart
brian@npart.co

Flip Oakes Wild Thing Bb Trumpet in copper
Flip Oakes Wild Thing Flugelhorn

There is one reason that I practice: to be ready at the downbeat when the final trumpet sounds.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Capt.Kirk
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Feb 2009
Posts: 5792

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nickel can be a bit much or but another way too much of a good thing. You can make a horn that is bright or one that is dark and build it out of all nickel. The thing about nickel is it tends to amplify the effect of a trumpets design. Some people think all nickel honrs are too edgy and harsh. I like nickel for leadpipes and main tuning slide because it eliminates red-rot issue's. I do not think I would ever build an all nickel horn unless I was forced to use nickel or Muntz Metal/German Silver due to war material issues same thing goes for gilding jacket metal would not be my first choice to build an entire horn from!

I think their are good reasons for using all of the various nickel and copper alloys used in brass. More often then not I think profit margin dictates the cheapest material be used and that is why we have so many trumpets from he high end domestics that are all yellow brass. As you buy in bulk price drops one material means more of that material so better pricing due to economy of scale. Not only do we not see any new designs come out of the large domestics but when they do decided to rearange their already well sorted parts and pieces into a new to us today combo seldom are the details and materials carried over. For instance Kanstul I here has a wonderful copy of the Conn Constellation you can not getit in stock trim with a copper bell or solid nickel bell let alone 100% nickel construction as it was first made when it gained it's fame or reputation. All the little details are not their either. This is not a slight against Kanstul either. Just pointing out one of the short coming of today. Sure you can order it with a copper bell or copper leadpipe or both I am sure but not in 100% nickel!

You do not see many high end trumpets offered in rose brass,bronze or hand hammered copper or silver either. Most Rose Brass bell's are on Chinese import student instruments as are rose and copper leadpipes and tuning slides.

Look at Holton,Reynolds and Olds use of copper,rose brass,bronze and nickel sometimes a two piece bell would have both copper and nickel in it. You just do not see that type of multi-material use in most Domestic Pro horns today and it is sad. Not only is it beautiful but it has purpose as well and not just to prevent red-rot.

I would say that today much more so then in the past horns are built with the idea of them being disposable and not as a form of art. Today they can either use laser engraving which is cheap and accurate or etching technology also cheap yet we do not see all the elaborate designs we saw back when horns where all hand built! Seeing how everything is more automated then ever and fewer workers are used then ever in history to build horns the profit margin has to be higher then ever as well. SO why no art? You only give the customer what they expect or demand nothing more!

OP their is some research on the internet that shows that nickel has more harmonics and is more efficient at lower sound pressure levels. As the volume increase's yellow brass showed more favorable harmonics and efficiency. Most nickel horns I have played all nickel that is have tended to brighten with volume even the darker sounding models. I am not keen on a trumpet that brightens up when I push it! I kind of like to be the one in control of that. SO if you play test an all nickel horn if anyone even makes those anymore keep that in mind and watch for it. I do not think most of us will notice too much difference just slight if one small part like the leadpipe or tuning slide is made from nickel.

One side note. I have read that some people with two or more Martin large Bore Comm horns one plain one deluxe have not liked the Deluxe model at all. They claim all the nickel on it drastically alters the sound so that it does not sound at all like standard model.

Oh one last thing strike a piece of nickel with your thumb nail. Did you hear that pure ringing noise? If you get a nickel horn all nickel to light off what sound do you think the tubing vibrating like mad is going to amplify and put out? Now strike a piece of like size and weight brass tubing hear the difference?
_________________
The only easy day was yesterday!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dale Proctor
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 7777
Location: Heart of Dixie

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a couple old Conn cornets, a 76A and a 5A, with solid nickel leadpipes. I think it's a great idea for a leadpipe - no rot. These two 40+ year old horns look like new inside the pipe. I don't think I'd like the sound characteristics of a solid nickel bell, though.

The 5A has quite a bit of nickel on it, since the outer slides are also nickel. Don't know if the nickel helps, but it's one great playing horn!


_________________
Olde Towne Brass
www.otbrass.com

Brass Band of Huntsville
www.brassbandofhuntsville.com

"Brass bands are all very well in their place - outdoors and several miles away ." - Sir Thomas Beecham
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bill Blackwell
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 902
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

shofarguy wrote:
... So, I think nickel is used to balance response characteristics and bring a crispness to a horn. Look at two Kanstul flugels, the 1025 and the 1525. The Chicago has a smaller, tighter bell taper and flare, which produces a compact sound that has plenty of core. No nickel is used in the tubing. The 1525 has a big, soft, copper bell, a big open wrap and can sound pretty fluffy. To bring in some structure to the feel and sound, nickel is used on the valve tubing. ...


I mean no disrespect to my friend, Brian, but there could be no greater apples vs. oranges comparison than between the 1025 and 1525. In fact, the only things these two horns have in common are their points of origin and the brand name on the bell.
_________________
Wild Thing Bb
Wild Thing Bb - Copper
Wild Thing Flugelhorn - Copper
Wild Thing Short-Model Cornet - Copper
Flip Oakes 'C'

"If you come to a fork in the road, take it."
- Yogi Berra
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jgambill
Regular Member


Joined: 26 Jan 2010
Posts: 26
Location: Fredericksburg, VA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The reason I asked about this was because of the post below on TM by Brett Getzen that seems to imply that the silver nickel is used in less expensive horns.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Re: Difference between Getzen Capri(590) and Getzen 700 Eterna

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A few things to clear up.

First off, make sure you are talking about the right 700 trumpet. There is a 700S and a 700SP "Special". With the 700S being the much better of the two.

Second, there are a lot of differences between a 700S and a 590:
Inside Slides: 700S=Gold Brass; 590=Nickel Silver
Mouthpipe: 700S=Gold Brass; 590=Nickel Silver
The bells and mouthpipes are also of different tapers. There are other, more minor, differences like bracing, trim, the 590 coming standard with a 1st slide trigger, and a 700S only being offered in bright silver plate.

Third, the 700S does not have a seamless bell. That is the 700SP.

Fourth, there is no difference between the 700S Eterna and the 700S Eterna II. That was merely a name change for marketing reasons.

Finally, while the 700S isn't the same as the original 900/900 Eterna Classic, it is close. Prior to reintroducing the original 900 design as the Eterna Classic, the 700S was the closest thing in our line to the old design.

Hope this helps.

Brett Getzen"
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
However, based on the responses, it appears that the use of silver nickel for certain parts of the instrument is not a bad idea from a long lasting point of view. I was not really considering a new trumpet but I am looking for a new (to me) flugelhorn and wanted to know if I should stay away from models that had silver nickel parts.

jgambill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shofarguy
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 5091
Location: AZ

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill Blackwell wrote:
shofarguy wrote:
... So, I think nickel is used to balance response characteristics and bring a crispness to a horn. Look at two Kanstul flugels, the 1025 and the 1525. The Chicago has a smaller, tighter bell taper and flare, which produces a compact sound that has plenty of core. No nickel is used in the tubing. The 1525 has a big, soft, copper bell, a big open wrap and can sound pretty fluffy. To bring in some structure to the feel and sound, nickel is used on the valve tubing. ...


I mean no disrespect to my friend, Brian, but there could be no greater apples vs. oranges comparison than between the 1025 and 1525. In fact, the only things these two horns have in common are their points of origin and the brand name on the bell.


That's exactly why I chose them as examples, Bill. With different Bells, wraps, valves et.al, the choice to add nickel to the 1525 might have been to add in brightness. The 1025 has sharper bends, narrower taper to the bell, yellow brass in place of copper. No need to add brightness here.

Another example could be the 1500 and 1601. The heavy copper bell of the 1500 benefits from the nickel, while Tim chose yellow brass tubing for his horn (with its lighter, much brighter and responsive copper bell) to give the 1601 its characteristic response.

Brian
_________________
Brian A. Douglas
Co-founder and President of nPart
brian@npart.co

Flip Oakes Wild Thing Bb Trumpet in copper
Flip Oakes Wild Thing Flugelhorn

There is one reason that I practice: to be ready at the downbeat when the final trumpet sounds.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bill Blackwell
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 902
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Capt.Kirk wrote:
... You do not see many high end trumpets offered in rose brass,bronze or hand hammered copper or silver either. Most Rose Brass bell's are on Chinese import student instruments as are rose and copper leadpipes and tuning slides. ...


What!!????

John:

Kanstul makes at least two popular Bb professional models with copper bells - the 1500 and the 1601 (in your choice of lacquer or silver); Schilke offers at least two Bb models with copper bells - the B5 and B6 - both in silver plate only; the Conn Vintage One (also a professional model made in the USA) is available with a Rose Brass bell; and there are many others.

Contrarily, I can’t think of one “Chinese import student instrument” matching these specs (as you suggest).
_________________
Wild Thing Bb
Wild Thing Bb - Copper
Wild Thing Flugelhorn - Copper
Wild Thing Short-Model Cornet - Copper
Flip Oakes 'C'

"If you come to a fork in the road, take it."
- Yogi Berra
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Maarten van Weverwijk
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 04 Jan 2006
Posts: 3208

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill Blackwell wrote:
...professional models with copper/rose brass bell...there are many others...

The Getzen 3850 cornet comes to mind as well as some Eclipse instruments.

MvW.


Last edited by Maarten van Weverwijk on Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:27 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GenoValet
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 30 Aug 2006
Posts: 1244

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill Blackwell wrote:
Capt.Kirk wrote:
... You do not see many high end trumpets offered in rose brass,bronze or hand hammered copper or silver either. Most Rose Brass bell's are on Chinese import student instruments as are rose and copper leadpipes and tuning slides. ...


What!!????

John:

Kanstul makes at least two popular Bb professional models with copper bells - the 1500 and the 1601 (in your choice of lacquer or silver); Schilke offers at least two Bb models with copper bells - the B5 and B6 - both in silver plate only; the Conn Vintage One (also a professional model made in the USA) is available with a Rose Brass bell; and there are many others.

Contrarily, I can’t think of one “Chinese import student instrument” matching these specs (as you suggest).


To John's examples you could add the 1959 Mt V Bach Strad with red brass bell I once owned, & my Marcinkiewicz Fluegel (under Ag & Au). Hardly "student models". . ..
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
trmptz
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 17 Sep 2004
Posts: 730
Location: St. Louis "Blues"!

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Capt.Kirk wrote:
Nickel can be a bit much or but another way too much of a good thing. You can make a horn that is bright or one that is dark and build it out of all nickel. The thing about nickel is it tends to amplify the effect of a trumpets design. Some people think all nickel honrs are too edgy and harsh. I like nickel for leadpipes and main tuning slide because it eliminates red-rot issue's. I do not think I would ever build an all nickel horn unless I was forced to use nickel or Muntz Metal/German Silver due to war material issues same thing goes for gilding jacket metal would not be my first choice to build an entire horn from!

I think their are good reasons for using all of the various nickel and copper alloys used in brass. More often then not I think profit margin dictates the cheapest material be used and that is why we have so many trumpets from he high end domestics that are all yellow brass. As you buy in bulk price drops one material means more of that material so better pricing due to economy of scale. Not only do we not see any new designs come out of the large domestics but when they do decided to rearange their already well sorted parts and pieces into a new to us today combo seldom are the details and materials carried over. For instance Kanstul I here has a wonderful copy of the Conn Constellation you can not getit in stock trim with a copper bell or solid nickel bell let alone 100% nickel construction as it was first made when it gained it's fame or reputation. All the little details are not their either. This is not a slight against Kanstul either. Just pointing out one of the short coming of today. Sure you can order it with a copper bell or copper leadpipe or both I am sure but not in 100% nickel!

You do not see many high end trumpets offered in rose brass,bronze or hand hammered copper or silver either. Most Rose Brass bell's are on Chinese import student instruments as are rose and copper leadpipes and tuning slides.

Look at Holton,Reynolds and Olds use of copper,rose brass,bronze and nickel sometimes a two piece bell would have both copper and nickel in it. You just do not see that type of multi-material use in most Domestic Pro horns today and it is sad. Not only is it beautiful but it has purpose as well and not just to prevent red-rot.

I would say that today much more so then in the past horns are built with the idea of them being disposable and not as a form of art. Today they can either use laser engraving which is cheap and accurate or etching technology also cheap yet we do not see all the elaborate designs we saw back when horns where all hand built! Seeing how everything is more automated then ever and fewer workers are used then ever in history to build horns the profit margin has to be higher then ever as well. SO why no art? You only give the customer what they expect or demand nothing more!

OP their is some research on the internet that shows that nickel has more harmonics and is more efficient at lower sound pressure levels. As the volume increase's yellow brass showed more favorable harmonics and efficiency. Most nickel horns I have played all nickel that is have tended to brighten with volume even the darker sounding models. I am not keen on a trumpet that brightens up when I push it! I kind of like to be the one in control of that. SO if you play test an all nickel horn if anyone even makes those anymore keep that in mind and watch for it. I do not think most of us will notice too much difference just slight if one small part like the leadpipe or tuning slide is made from nickel.

One side note. I have read that some people with two or more Martin large Bore Comm horns one plain one deluxe have not liked the Deluxe model at all. They claim all the nickel on it drastically alters the sound so that it does not sound at all like standard model.

Oh one last thing strike a piece of nickel with your thumb nail. Did you hear that pure ringing noise? If you get a nickel horn all nickel to light off what sound do you think the tubing vibrating like mad is going to amplify and put out? Now strike a piece of like size and weight brass tubing hear the difference?



yawn....I'm tired now!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Bill Blackwell
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 902
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shofarguy wrote:
... With different Bells, wraps, valves et.al, the choice to add nickel to the 1525 might have been to add in brightness. The 1025 has sharper bends, narrower taper to the bell, yellow brass in place of copper. No need to add brightness here.

Another example could be the 1500 and 1601. The heavy copper bell of the 1500 benefits from the nickel, while Tim chose yellow brass tubing for his horn (with its lighter, much brighter and responsive copper bell) to give the 1601 its characteristic response.


Got it. My point was simply that between the 1025 and 1525 there are more (and greater) variables which might outweigh your point on the effects the differences in tubing materials might have in these cases. Your move to calling out the differences in the 1500 vs. 1601 is a more viable comparison with fewer variables beyond tubing. However, the best comparison would be between two horns with identical specs with the only changes being brass vs. nickel tubing. One would need this in order to prove your assertions about the differences in timbre. And this is not the case with these two horns either.

Therefore, I’m not sure it’s particularly “scientific” to justify the differences between them as tubing materials alone.

Hope all is well with you, Brian.

Is this a topic you've discussed with Zig?
_________________
Wild Thing Bb
Wild Thing Bb - Copper
Wild Thing Flugelhorn - Copper
Wild Thing Short-Model Cornet - Copper
Flip Oakes 'C'

"If you come to a fork in the road, take it."
- Yogi Berra
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
connicalman
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2007
Posts: 1538
Location: West Medford, MA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nickle on a bell can be done right. Yet to continue on as Capt Kirk points out, on the top-line Conn, the Connstellation nickle was electroplated over copper,which itself was electroplated on a mandrel. Not pressed. That seems like a lot of work, and man it sounds like nothing else.remember, there's materials, and then there's how you use them.

Glad to see the OP investigating deep into characteristics beyond the visual. I dont have experience with nickle beyond a handful of old Conns, but they do right by me, and nada knowledge with nickle on a flugel.

Hmm. After a quick scan of yee-bay, maybe steer clear of deals that seem too good to be true. Even if they are band approved!!! That, and I figure Getzen Co. knows a thing or two about making the most out of a price-point AND keeping customer satisfied. Note that the 5-series is above their 3 and 4. Maybe putting goods inthe right place with a nod toward durability? If simply a cost-saving measure, why not on their student / intro models?

I'd conclude, again without direct experience, that the nickle silver was specified on the 5XX Getzens for more than one good reason, not simply to save $. Beware cheap imitations!
_________________
kochaavim, csillaagkep, αστερρισμός, konnstelacji, connstellation... ...a.k.a. 28A
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shofarguy
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 5091
Location: AZ

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill Blackwell wrote:
shofarguy wrote:
... With different Bells, wraps, valves et.al, the choice to add nickel to the 1525 might have been to add in brightness. The 1025 has sharper bends, narrower taper to the bell, yellow brass in place of copper. No need to add brightness here.

Another example could be the 1500 and 1601. The heavy copper bell of the 1500 benefits from the nickel, while Tim chose yellow brass tubing for his horn (with its lighter, much brighter and responsive copper bell) to give the 1601 its characteristic response.


Got it. My point was simply that between the 1025 and 1525 there are more (and greater) variables which might outweigh your point on the effects the differences in tubing materials might have in these cases. Your move to calling out the differences in the 1500 vs. 1601 is a more viable comparison with fewer variables beyond tubing. However, the best comparison would be between two horns with identical specs with the only changes being brass vs. nickel tubing. One would need this in order to prove your assertions about the differences in timbre. And this is not the case with these two horns either.

Therefore, I’m not sure it’s particularly “scientific” to justify the differences between them as tubing materials alone.

Hope all is well with you, Brian.

Is this a topic you've discussed with Zig?


Ah, Bill,

That's why I started by comparing the two French taper mouth pipes I have, one nickel and the other brass, for my flugelhorn and how they effect sound a response.

Maybe I was CK like and too long in my post??

Brian
_________________
Brian A. Douglas
Co-founder and President of nPart
brian@npart.co

Flip Oakes Wild Thing Bb Trumpet in copper
Flip Oakes Wild Thing Flugelhorn

There is one reason that I practice: to be ready at the downbeat when the final trumpet sounds.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bill Blackwell
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 902
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shofarguy wrote:
... That's why I started by comparing the two French taper mouth pipes I have, one nickel and the other brass, for my flugelhorn and how they effect sound a response. Maybe I was CK like and too long in my post?? ...


Not at all - I got that at the beginning of your original post.

You might be dead on; it's just that there are so many other variables in your example(s).

Maybe I'll PM Tim Wendt and see if he might have something to say on the subject.

Kindest regards, Bill
_________________
Wild Thing Bb
Wild Thing Bb - Copper
Wild Thing Flugelhorn - Copper
Wild Thing Short-Model Cornet - Copper
Flip Oakes 'C'

"If you come to a fork in the road, take it."
- Yogi Berra
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
VetPsychWars
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 6119
Location: Greenfield WI

PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, people are getting confused.

Some horns may have nickel plating in various places. The original poster is asking about "nickel silver" tubing, not nickel plating. While people's comments regarding nickel plating may be valid, it does not answer the original question.

Nickel silver is, obviously, a different color. It is also harder than the usual brass alloys used in trumpet manufacture. It is also less susceptible to red rot. You'd have to ask a brass tech whether nickel-silver tubing is more or less difficult to remove dents from.

Buescher in the golden age advertised nickel-silver tubing as more wear-resistant and allegedly placed it on the horn where your hands were more likely to abrade the tubing. Marketing BS? Probably. The 400 instruments when introduced had nickel-silver mouthpipes as standard. These were changed to brass after the war for the most part, though my mid-50s cornet does have a nickel-silver mouthpipe, so perhaps there was an option. As others have mentioned, it will be more corrosion-resistant.

Aside from that, there may be some small difference in how a horn plays between all brass and a mix. It won't be huge, and once you adapt, the difference is likely gone.

Tom
_________________


Buescher Lightweight 400
Other Buescher horns 1939--1955
Al Cass 1-28 mouthpiece
Humes and Berg mutes
http://mmccband.org
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> Horns All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group